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Homeostatic effect of laughter on diabetic cardiovascular complications: The myth turned to fact

  • Mohamed H. Noureldein
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiological Sciences, American University of Beirut, PO Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon.
    Affiliations
    Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon

    Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
    Search for articles by this author
  • Assaad A. Eid
    Correspondence
    Corresponding authors at: Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiological Sciences, American University of Beirut, PO Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh 1107 2020 Beirut, Lebanon.
    Affiliations
    Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 20, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2017.11.014

      Abstract

      Aims

      Laughter has been used for centuries to alleviate pain in morbid conditions. It was not until 1976 that scientists thought about laughter as a form of therapy that can modulate hormonal and immunological parameters that affect the outcome of many serious diseases. Moreover, laughter therapy was shown to be beneficial in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by delaying the onset of many diabetic complications. Laughter is also described to influence the cardiovascular and endothelial functions and thus may protect against diabetic cardiovascular complications. In this review, we outline the different biochemical, physiological and immunological mechanisms by which laughter may influence the overall state of wellbeing and enhance disease prognosis. We also focus on the biological link between laughter therapy and diabetic cardiovascular complications as well as the underlying mechanisms involved in T2DM.

      Methods

      Reviewing all the essential databases for “laughter” and “type 2 diabetes mellitus”.

      Results

      Although laughter therapy is still poorly investigated, recent studies show that laughter may retard the onset of diabetic complications, enhance cardiovascular functions and rectify homeostatic abnormalities associated with T2DM.

      Conclusions

      Laughter therapy is effective in delaying diabetic complications and should be used as an adjuvant therapy.

      Keywords

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